Siding and Trim

Preventative Care for Wood Siding

Inspect once a year—find small problems before they become LARGE

  • Look for cracks, gaps, splitting wood.
  • Pay close attention to vertical seams in siding.
    • Wood can expand and contract, cause cracking.
  • Consult a professional or conduct research to do repairs on your own.
    • Fill minor gaps and cracks with a acrylic/latex caulk.
      • Inspect caulk on a regular basis, particularly in areas of intense UV exposure.
    • Do not over-seal exterior siding. A building needs to breathe and you must allow for moisture to evaporate from behind the siding.
      • The underside of lapped siding allows for some breathability, do not caulk this opening.

To extend the life of a paint job:

  • Every 2 to 3 years, clean dirt and mildew from surface with a gently cleaner.
    • Do not power wash.
    • Better options for exterior materials:
      • Clean with diluted TSP
        • Information and precautions for cleaning with TSP, please read and use with care.

www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infxtra/inftsp.html

Clean with a 1:10 bleach to water solution.

If have a large mold or mildew problem it could be worth investigating the area.

  • Is there moisture coming up from the ground into the walls?
  • Is there evidence of moisture on the other side of the wall that can be seen from the inside?
  • Is the wood actually rotting?
  • Is there enough airflow behind the siding?

Inspect how water is being moved away from the building. When safe, stand outside in the rain and watch where water is traveling.

  • Water running over from a gutter? Causing damage at gutter as well as splash back on ground below?
  • Leaks in downspouts?
  • Splash back from a road or sidewalk (or gutter located above)?
  • Rising damp from poor drainage under the building?
  • How is water getting away from the building?
    • Downspouts
    • Sump pump drainage
  • All surfaces within six feet of the foundation should be sloped away from house at least a ¼” per foot.
  • Are the gutters sloped correctly?
  • Address these problems as well or you will find yourself redoing the repairs soon

Siding and Building Trim Materials

Painting Wood Siding and Trim

Preparing the surface

  • The possible presence of lead paint must be addressed. Contracted labor as well as homeowners should use proper safety precautions and appropriate removal methods for any lead-based paints.
    • Lead paint is very dangerous for small children.
  • If a large amount of paint is coming loose, the surface is uneven and in poor shape:
    • Old loose paint must be removed before a new coat of paint is applied.
      • If old peeling paint is left on and new paint is placed on top, it will only be as strong as the paint below it.
      • The new paint will expand and contract at a different rate than the old paint, causing it to fail.
    • Use a high-quality primer—not fast-drying latex primer, should use slow-drying oil primer.
    • Use high quality paint—two coats (depends on color of paint).
  • If surface was recently painted and in good condition but beginning to dull and wear thin:
    • Do not need to strip down to bare wood every time a building is painted.
    • Just clean wood and do a light sanding to prepare the surface.

Do it right the first time

  • Thorough preparation of the surfaces will result in a longer lasting paint job.
    • Completely removing old paint, sanding, and priming will extend the life of a paint job.
  • Quality paint is worth the investment.
    • But without proper surface preparation even quality paint will not last.
    • Cheap out on paint and you will find yourself painting again sooner than you should need to.
      • Virginia Paint & Decorating Centers—Helpful employees, quality products

www.virginiapaintcompany.com/sb.cn

  • A large part of the cost when painting a home is the labor, realize this going into the process.
    • Does the cheapest option have the experience, licenses, and skills you need?

Space out maintenance

  • Consider painting one façade or area (e.g., a porch) of your home each year. By doing it in phases, the cost will be spread out over time.

Proper temperature for paint application

  • Generally not lower than 55 degrees F.
    • The paint can may say otherwise, but attempt at your own risk.
    • Temp needs to stay at a good level until dry. What will the temperature be in 12 hours?
  • Be wary of painting in extreme heat.
    • Paint drying too quickly can be a problem as well.

References

Preservation Brief 8—Aluminum and Vinyl Siding on Historic Buildings by John H. Myers, revised by Gary L. Hume
http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs.htm

Preservation Brief 10—Exterior Paint Problems on Historic Woodwork by Kay D. Weeks and David W. Look, AIA
http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs.htm

Preservation Brief 16—The Use of Substitute Materials on Historic Building Exteriors by H. Ward Jandl
http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs.htm

Preservation Brief 37 – Appropriate Methods for Reducing Lead-Paint Hazards in Historic Housing by Sharon C. Park, FAIA, and Douglas C. Hicks
https://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs/37-lead-paint-hazards.htm

Preservation Brief 47—Maintaining the Exterior of Small and Medium Size Historic Buildings by Sharon C. Park, AIA
http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs/47-maintaining-exteriors.htm

Vinyl vs. Wood Siding your House—The Old House Guy
http://www.oldhouseguy.com/vinyl-siding/

Benjamin Moore Paints—Historical Collection
http://media.benjaminmoore.com/WebServices/prod/ColorCards2012/historicalcollection/index.html

Benjamin Moore Paints—Williamsburg Color Collection
http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/for-your-home/williamsburg-color-collection